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From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - DWR launches hunting & fishing app

Salt Lake City, Utah - Utah.Gov, a leader in mobile and online technology, with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) recently launched a free Hunting and Fishing iPhone and Android app. The application gives Utah's outdoor enthusiasts the best information available on their mobile phones and helps them get the most out of their outdoor adventures. The application is Utah's mobile resource for wildlife events, licenses, permits, and communicating with the DWR for outdoor enthusiasts.

Greg Sheehan, director of the Division of Wildlife Resources, says the free app allows hunters, anglers and wildlife watchers to blend their outdoor adventures and the latest technology together, "The app makes it easier to obtain and display hunting and fishing licenses," Sheehan says. "It provides users with quick access to information that will help them in the field. We encourage you to download it, and give it a try."

The Utah DWR surveyed the current technology and looked for ways to provide a leading edge solution that would enhance the outdoor experience for hunters and anglers... more on Utah's new hunting & fishing app ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - Utah prairie dog still protected

Utah prairie dogs are still fully protected by Utah state law - Photo by Lynn Chamberlain.

Court ruling raises questions

Salt Lake City, Utah - A recent court decision has left some in southern Utah wondering whether the Utah prairie dog — a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act — is still protected in the state.

The answer is yes. Although the court ruling invalidated federal protections on state and private lands, Utah prairie dogs are still fully protected by Utah state law.

Unless you have a certificate of registration from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR), you may not kill or remove a Utah prairie dog.

Court decision

The ruling by Federal Judge Dee Benson returned management authority—for Utah prairie dogs that are on non-federal land in Utah—back to the state. DWR Director Greg Sheehan is happy about the ruling.

More on the status of Prairie dogs in Utah ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - Utah's most prized big game permits

If you draw the 2015 sportsman permit for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, you'll have plenty of days and plenty of places to find your trophy. You can apply for a sportsman permit starting Oct. 28. Photo by Brent Stettler.

Applications for 2015 sportsman permits accepted soon

Salt Lake City, Utah - You can apply for next year's most prized Utah big game hunting permits — 2015 sportsman permits — starting Oct. 28.

Only Utah residents can apply for sportsman permits. One sportsman permit is offered for each of the following species: Desert bighorn ram, Rocky Mountain bighorn ram, buck deer, buck pronghorn, bull elk, bull moose, hunter's choice bison and hunter's choice Rocky Mountain goat.

More on Utah's Big Game Hunting permits ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - DWR to release 11,000 pheasants

This season might be the perfect season to hunt pheasants in Utah. Thousands of pheasants will be released on public hunting areas before the hunt opens on Nov. 1. - Photo by Ron Stewart
Salt Lake City, Utah - If it's been years since you hunted pheasants, it's time to grab your gun and head afield. More than 11,000 pheasants will be released on 56 public hunting areas during Utah's upcoming pheasant hunt.

The hunt opens on Nov. 1. But you don't have to hunt that day to get in on the action — pheasants will be released before each weekend of the hunt.

The one exception is the week of Thanksgiving. That week, birds will be released early in the week so plenty of pheasants will be available to pursue over the Thanksgiving holiday.

More on pheasant season in Utah ...

Sometimes the best laid hunting plans fall victim to the environment and fate

Shawn Skipper with his elk - image from American Hunter magazine Shawn Skipper gets more than he bargained for during his Utah elk hunt ...

Out of the Hole
Battling bad luck, a broken truck and the flu, the author relies on sheer grit when chasing elk up and down a foreboding Utah landscape.

Elk can bark. Wait, elk can bark? Why didn’t anyone tell me elk can bark? These are barking—at me. Is that good? That can’t be good. There’s no way that’s good.

Do I bark back?

And so went my thoughts as I sat crouched in the snow some 300 yards away from the herd we’d spent hours stalking. The herd that hid the one thing I’d traveled so many miles and scaled so many steep, snowy inclines to find: a bull.

More Skipper's Utah Elk hunt ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - Apply for a cougar hunting permit

Applications accepted until Oct. 9, 2014

If you want to hunt cougars on a limited-entry unit in Utah, you need to get your application in no later than 11 p.m. on Oct. 9.
If you want to hunt cougars on a limited-entry unit in Utah, you need to get your application in no later than 11 p.m. on Oct. 9 - Photo by Lynn Chamberlain

If you want to hunt cougars on a limited-entry unit in Utah, you need to get your application in soon.

Applications for hunting permits will be accepted until 11 p.m. on Oct. 9.

Judi Tutorow, wildlife licensing coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources, reminds you that if you draw a limited-entry permit, you cannot buy a permit to hunt on a harvest-objective unit. "Before you apply for a permit," she says, "make sure a limited-entry hunt is the hunt you want to participate in."

More information about the two permits is available on pages 11–13 of the free 2014–2015 Utah Cougar Guidebook. You can also get a copy at DWR offices and from hunting license agents across Utah.

More on cougar and elk hunting in Utah ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - Duck, goose & swan hunt starts Oct. 4

Canada goose numbers second highest in 10 years

Pintail ducks are highly prized among many Utah hunters. Thousands of pintails will migrate through Utah this fall.
Pintail ducks are highly prized among many Utah hunters. Thousands of pintails will migrate through Utah this fall - Photo courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A mixed bag awaits Utah's waterfowl hunters this fall:

  • The number of Canada geese produced in the state is the second highest in the past 10 years. Couple that with good production in Montana and western Canada, and this could be a banner year for Canada goose hunting in Utah.
  • Duck hunters can expect plenty of birds to migrate through the state. The number of ducks produced in Utah was down this spring, but production in Alaska, Montana and most of Alberta and British Columbia was up. The question is, how long will the ducks remain in Utah? The water level on Great Salt Lake is close to its lowest point on record. A smaller lake means ducks won't have as many places to escape hunters when hunting pressure builds on the marshes.
  • With only one exception, marsh conditions are great on state waterfowl management areas across Utah. And conditions are also good at the federal Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge west of Brigham City. At both the state and federal areas, managers were able to keep water on the main marsh units throughout the summer.

    Wetlands outside of the WMAs and the refuge are much drier. Dry conditions on these seasonal marshes will force hunters into a smaller area. It will also reduce the places waterfowl can go, to escape hunting pressure on the WMAs and the refuge.

More on Utah's duck, goose and swan hunting season ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources - Take a young person duck hunting

Young hunters will have the marshes all to themselves on Sept. 20. That’s the day Utah hosts its annual Youth Waterfowl Hunt.
Young hunters will have the marshes all to themselves for Utah's annual Youth Waterfowl Hunt. Photo by Keith Fullenkamp
Salt Lake City, Utah - Hunters 15 years of age and younger will have Utah's marshes — and the ducks and geese that go with them — all to themselves on Sept. 20.

That's the day Utah hosts its annual Youth Waterfowl Hunt.

And this year, even young people who haven't completed a Hunter Education course can participate through a new program offered in Utah.

The state's Trial Hunting program allows someone 21 years of age or older to take a person 12 to 15 years old hunting, even if the 12- to 15-year-old hasn't completed Hunter Education.

See more information about the Trial Hunting program.

More on Utah's special Youth Hunts ...

From the Utah Division of Wildlife ResourcesApproved bobcat hunting changes

Cougar hunting rules also approved

Hunters and trappers will have more chances to take bobcats in Utah this season.
Hunters & trappers will have more chances to take bobcats in Utah - Photo courtesy of Gary Kramer & the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Salt Lake City, Utah - At their Aug. 28 meeting, members of the Utah Wildlife Board approved a recommendation to allow an individual hunter or trapper to obtain up to six bobcat permits.

During the 2013–2014 season, each trapper or hunter could not obtain more than three bobcat permits. Also, during the 2013–2014 season, not more than 4,600 hunters and trappers were allowed to participate. This season, there's no limit on the number of hunters and trappers who can purchase up to six permits each.

Board members also approved cougar hunting rules at the meeting. The rules that were approved should result in hunters taking about the same number of cougars this season as were taken in Utah during the 2013–2014 season.

More on big cat hunting in Utah ...

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