By Lars Dalseide | March 25 2014 10:53

Law inspired by Pop Tart chewed into the shape of a gun reaches the Governor's desk

Washington Times Senior Editor Emily Miller's new book, Emily gets her Gun Emily Miller, senior editor of opinion for The Washington Times and author of “Emily Gets Her Gun” (Regnery, 2013), updates the progress on Florida's battle to uphold reason ...

Florida set to pass Pop Tart gun bill to protect kids playing in school

Zero tolerance laws taken too far by administrators.

The days of kids playing cops and robbers or cowboys and Indians in the schoolyard may come to an end because of overly zealous “zero tolerance” policies.

Over the past year, schools have increasingly punished children for playing games that involve pretend firearms. Now Florida is leading the nation in stopping this madness. On Tuesday, the Florida Senate Education Committee unanimously passed a measure that has become known as the “Pop Tart bill.”

The legislation got its nickname from an incident involving Josh Welch, a 7-year-old Maryland boy who was suspended from school in March 2013 for chewing his strawberry Pop Tart into the shape of a gun.

The Florida bill makes it clear that children in public schools will be allowed to simulate firearms while playing without risk of disciplinary action or being referred to the criminal or juvenile justice system.

The Florida House passed the companion bill Thursday by an overwhelming vote of 98-17. Republican Gov. Rick Scott’s spokeswoman Jackie Schutz told me, “The governor supports the Second Amendment and our state’s self-defense law and will review any bill that comes to his desk.”

Marion Hammer, a former president of the National Rifle Association (NRA) and the current head of its Florida lobbying operation said that, “Children should not be punished because some adult lacks common sense or the capacity for rational judgment.”

Ms. Hammer said the NRA supports the legislation because it would “give guidance and relief to school administrators who must walk a fine line between following the law and protecting our children” as well as “stop the abusive result of overreactions of some administrators.”

The House legislation lists the types of games that cannot get a kid into trouble, such as “brandishing a partially consumed pastry or other food item to simulate a firearm or weapon.”


Read the rest of Emily Miller's article on Florida's passing of the Pop Tart gun bill on the Washington Times website.


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