By Kyle Jillson | March 31 2013 14:37

Bethel and Texas A&M universities come out on top at the ACUI American Skeet Championships

American Skeet Champion Casey Jones of Bethel University at the ACUI Clay Target Championships in San Antonio, Texas

San Antonio, Texas - Out of the nearly 500 collegiate shotgun shooters who entered yesterday's American Skeet Championships, a mere 1% shot a perfect 100.

Five men racked up four clean skeet rounds of 25 hits a piece. But there is no five way tie for first. There is also no championship round. Unlike the international variant, American Skeet has no finals. If you're the shooter with the highest score after everyone takes their turn, you win.

But that doesn't happen most of the time. As yesterday's results proved, the level of skill gathered at the ACUI Clay Target Championships appears to be that of equally matched shooters.

So how are first through third places decided? Tiebreaker.

A pseudo-final if you will. If, for instance, two shooters are tied for the lead, the next highest score automatically earns third place and does not participate in the finals..

Trinity University shooter Matt Parmley at the ACUI Clay Target Championships in San Antonio, Texas

This was the case with the Women's Championship. Brandy Drozd of Texas A&M held sole possession of first place with a practically perfect 99. Right behind her was Missouri's Allison Caselman with a 98. In third there was a tie; between Texas A&M's Bailey Glenewinkel and Lindenwood's Cassandra Douglas, each at 97.

Stepping to the firing line, competitors would take turns shooting doubles from stations three, four and five. As with a regular round of skeet, shooters had to wait until everyone finished a station before moving to the next. Of course here, if you missed a clay and broke the tie, you were out.

Whether it was jitters, a bad lead, or the wind, the tie for third was settled at station three when Glenewinkel hit both her clays and Douglas registered a miss.

Now it was time for five men to determine gold, silver and bronze. Three would step up to the podium later that night, but two would be left on the floor. Each represented a different school; Bethel University, Fort Hays State University, University of Louisiana-Lafayette, University of Missouri and Trinity University.

Fort Hays State University shooter Damian Giles at the ACUI Clay Target Championships in San Antonio, Texas

All shooters began well by clearing station three and moving on to four. Here, Trinity's Matt Parmley was the first to fall. He was soon followed by Louisiana-Lafayette's Josh Raley at station five.

With two out, the remaining shooters were all guaranteed to medal. It was their order that remained uncertain.

Rotating back to station three, the tiebreaker continued.

Upon reaching station five for the second time, Missouri's Glenn Carl missed and cemented himself at bronze.

Shooters shake hands after breaking the tie for first at the ACUI Clay Target Championships in San Antonio, Texas

It was now down to the final two; Bethel's Casey Jones and Fort Hays' Damian Giles. Going head-to-head, the final face-off be over in a flash. After breaking both clays at station three, it finally came to an end when Jones broke his station four clays and Giles didn't.

The tension lifted, the two men congratulated each other and returned to their teammates.

The last skeet event of the championships is complete.

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