By Lars Dalseide | January 9 2013 17:13

First time use of Remington 11-87 Police Shotgun keeps straight for the win

Left barrel view of Patrolman Charles Blohm's 11-87 Remington Police Shotgun

Albuquerque, New Mexico - The shotgun can be an intimidating firearm. When used by Law Enforcement, that's part of the point. When used at the National Police Shooting Championships at Albuquerque's Shooting Range Park, there better be a little bit of accuracy thrown in there too. If you want to win the Grand Championship that is.

That's why Patrolman Charles "Chase" Blohm, Jr. of the Shelby County Sheriff's Office in Memphis, Tennessee (who finished the 2012 National Police Shooting Championships ranked as the High Sheriff) went with a Remington 11-87.

"For years I was borrowing a shotgun from one of the guys," explained Blohm. "It was time to buy one, so this is what I purchased for this year's Nationals."

Patrolman Charles 'Chase' Blohm's 11-87 Remington Police Shotgun

If you follow our coverage of the National Police Shooting Championships, you might be scratching your head about now. Shotgun? Where's the shotgun portion of the competition? When does that happen? It happens all the time.

Unlike the scheduled rounds of matches for pistols and revolvers, the shotgun match is just one single match. And because there is only one single match, competitors are allowed to schedule said match for any time during the competition.

Not everyone shoots the Shotgun Match ... but you have to shoot the Shotgun Match if you want to eligible for the Grand Championship.

Right barrel view of Patrolman Charles Blohm's 11-87 Remington Police Shotgun at NRA Police Championships

Firing a 537 (3X) out of a possible 550, Blohm and his 11-87 were within reach. But the chasm between within reach and winning the overall title can be a big one.

"I pushed a couple to the left," he chuckled. "That's okay, it happens. It's still a superb gun though. I really love shooting it."

How much? So much that this Remington shotgun has only seen the light of day for practice and competition. According to Blohm, it has never been placed in a patrol car, gun rack or taken out into the field.

"I could use it for patrol, but so far it's just for competition. Not for ducks or hunting. It's no where near long enough for that."

Right action view of Patrolman Charles Blohm's 11-87 Remington Police Shotgun at NRA Police Championships in New Mexico

In an environment where every point counts, a familiarity with your firearm is practically a necessity. Shooting a gun that you borrow, no matter how many times, increases the possibility of dropping points. Sometimes that can't be avoided. As the price of competition level firearms continues to rise, competitors are forced to pick their purchasing spots rather carefully.

"Eventually you purchase your own. I'll continue the pattern of borrowing guns from time to time, but eventually I'll have my own. There's still a four inch revolver I need to pick up but I am bit particular. Also need a stock semi-auto too. But that's a lot of money right there.

"It'll happen in time."

Hopefully in time to move from High Sheriff to Grand Aggregate Champion. As long as that 11-87 shotgun keeps shooting true.

Left action view of Patrolman Charles Blohm's 11-87 Remington Police Shotgun at NRA Police Championships in Albuquerque

Miss the High Sheriff's first two guns? Then go take a peek:

Comments are closed

Powered by BlogEngine.NET Theme by Cylosoft © Copyright 2014 The National Rifle Association of America