Cleaning and maintaining your firearm means better performance on the range or in the field

NRA Family Insights guide to cleaning your gun The staff from NRA Family Insights sat down to bring you the basics for how to properly clean your firearm ...

How to Clean Your Gun
Can your firearm pass the white-glove test? Here's how to keep your gun clean and safe to use.

Cleaning and maintaining your guns preserves their functionality and value, and keeps them safe and accurate. The effort and attention you put into maintaining your firearms will pay off in peace of mind that your guns will do what you need them to do. Good maintenance habits help you know your gun better, and have more confidence in its performance at the range or in the field.

Once you have the gun disassembled, start with cleaning the bore. The rifling at the muzzle is critical to accuracy. You don’t want the cleaning rod to bang against the muzzle opening. Over time, this can widen the muzzle opening or leave it misshapen, so clean from breech to muzzle whenever possible.

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New temporary exhibit explores first uniquely American firearm

Kentucky rifle exhibit at the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Virginia

Fairfax, Virginia – The Kentucky rifle, whose role in world history helped secure American independence and settle the United States, is now featured in a new exhibit at the NRA National Firearms Museum. The Kentucky Rifle, A Complete Narrative 1750-1850 spans from the classic American longarm’s pre-Revolutionary War origins to the onset of the American Civil War.

“Kentucky rifle” is the common name for the American longrifle produced during the 18th and 19th centuries. Originating in the 1740s from German “Jaeger” rifles, deemed unsuitable for the backcountry, the Kentucky rifle was an essential tool for frontiersmen. By the 1760s, the rifle had evolved into a uniquely American firearm, possessing improved accuracy over contemporary rifles thanks to modified rifling and a long barrel. Although its nickname appears in advertisements as of the early 1800s, it was not popularized until the 1822 ballad “The Hunters of Kentucky,” commemorating the Battle of New Orleans.

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Find out what to expect from the world's biggest gun show right here in Tulsa

John Popp (l), Joe Wanenmacher (c) and NRA Museums Director Jim Supica at the Tulsa Arms Show

Tulsa, Oklahoma - Sure you've been to a gun show before. But have you ever been to the gun show? Well if you haven't been out to Oklanoma for Wanenmacher's Tulsa Arms Show then the answer is no.

"I've been coming here twice a year for a quarter of a century," said NRA Museums Director Jim Supica. "It is spectacular."

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Museum piece with NRA Test stamp part of NRA Publications collection

A double-barreled Savage Fox Model B NRA Test Shotgun

Fairfax, Virginia - There's a story behind every gun at the National Firearms Museum. Who owned it, where it was manufactured, where it was used, etc ... Unfortunately, not every story is compelling as the next. But for some, it's the story behind the story that makes them fascinating.

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NRA News breaks into the NRA Museum vault for another glimpse at World War II revolver

The Colt Commando Revolver circa WWII

Fairfax, Virginia - You know it's going to be a good day on Curator's Corner when you hear Philip Schreier say that this is one of his favorite guns. Being that Phil is the Senior Curator for NRA Museums, a favorite gun of Phil's has to be something special. This one is.

Fresh from the friendly confines of the NRA Museum vault, Phil brings out the quasi-rare Colt Commando Revolver. A World War II era four-inch six-shooter that brings a bit of economic efficiency encased in the design.

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Curator's Corner brings out Colt Official Police conversion that saw service in World War II

Colt Commando on display at the NRA National Firearms Museum

Fairfax, Virginia - Philip Schreier, Senior Curator at the NRA National Firearms Museum, has been the main attraction on NRA News' Curator's Corner for a number of years. If you're a fan of the series, then you've probably seen Phil bring out a favorite pistol or two, or ten. You see, while Phil will tell you it's his favorite pistol at that time, he'll also remind you that times change, don't they? But who can blame a man for having access to so many unique and incredible pistols?

This week, Phil's new favorite pistol is the Colt Commando.

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Surplus of British Pattern 14 Enfield rifles from WWI found their way to the Spanish Civil War

NRA Museums Senior Curator Philip Schreier with a Remington Pattern 14 Enfield Rifle

Fairfax, Virginia - October 22nd would have been the 100th birthday of Robert Capa. Born Endre Friedmann, Capa is perhaps the best known combat photojournalist of the 20th Century. Capturing images from the Spanish Civil War, the 1936 Japanese invasion of China, World War II and the First Indochina War.

In recognition of Capa's birthday, and his work, we focus on some of the firearms found in his breathtaking photos. Today that's the Remington Pattern 14 Enfield rifle.

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Highly engraved rifle found fame during the days of the plains buffalo hunts

The action of an 1873 pattern Sharps rifle at the National Firearms Museum

Fairfax, Virginia - Almost 3,000 guns are on display at the National Firearms Museum. What you may not know, however, is that a portion of these guns don't actually belong to the NRA. Some are simply on loan. Such is the case for the subject of this week's Curator's Corner — an 1873 pattern Sharps Rifle.

"This rifle has one of the finest engraving and figuring of wood I've ever seen," said Senior Curator Philip Schreier.

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Unique No. 1-stamped guns on display at NRA museum in Bass Pro Shops in Springfield, Missouri

Serial Number One Guns exhibit at the NRA Sporting Arms Museum in the Bass Pro Shops superstore in Springfield, Missouri

Springfield, Missouri - There's a new exhibit open at the NRA National Sporting Arms Museum at the Bass Pro Shops flagship superstore in Springfield, Mo -- Serial Number One Guns.

All 29 firearms, from the cap and ball percussion arms of the mid 1800s to a modern polymer frame semi-automatic pistol, featured in the unique exhibit sport a serial number of “1.” Among the pieces on display are a Smith & Wesson Schofield, Colt .40 caliber Model 1851 Navy, Springfield Sharps Model 1870 and more.

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