Trijicon and Peacemaker succeed in creating championship that offers variety of shooting experiences

Trijicon World Shooting Championship American Rifleman

American Rifleman's Brian Sheetz breaks down why the Trijicon World Shooting Championship is such a hit ...

Trijicon World Shoot Winds Down
After such an unqualified success as the Trijicon World Championship, it's obvious that Peacemaker has succeeded in its mission to bring excellence in a variety of shooting experiences to the masses.

From a wide range of competitors in both pro and amateur categories to sponsors and staff, the inaugural Trijicon World Shooting Championship appears to have been a success if it is to be judged by the enthusiastically affirmative responses that arose from the informal survey question, “Would you shoot it again next year or recommend it to a friend?”

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$8,000 NRA Foundation Grant helps shooting sports in the Texas Panhandle

Dallam County, Texas, 4-H Rifle Team receives NRA Foundation Grant

Dalhart, Texas - The Dallam County 4-H Shooting Sports Rifle Team of Dalhart, Texas, has recently benefited from Friends of NRA fundraising. On March 13, 2014, the local 4-H office received notification that the grant request submitted in November by a member of the Dallam Parent Leaders Association was approved by the Texas State Fund Committee and the Board of Trustees for the NRA Foundation, Inc.

Not only do these grants provide monetary support, but they also help to build valuable relationships within the shooting sports and Friend of NRA communities. Some valuable connections were made during the grant process this year at the local, state and national level. This year Dallam County 4-H Shooting Sports Rifle Team will receive a rifle and equipment valued at $8,343.21.

Under the instruction of Kelly McMurry and Martin Dettle of Dalhart, the Dallam County 4-H Shooting Sports Team, which competes in 3-position small-bore rifle, now has room to grow in numbers of participants and coaches. Our local team had one coach and seven members in 2013. We added a second coach earlier this year, and we hope to see our numbers continue to grow. The team will now have more equipment available for teaching and practicing and we hope it will have greater success in the upcoming district competition on May 9-10, 2014, in Amarillo.

More on The NRA Foundation's grant to the Dallam County 4-H ...

Open up professional shooter Matt Emmons' range bag and see what's helped him reach three Olympic Games

Olympic shooter Matt Emmons in NRA's Shooting Sports USA

Fairfax, Virginia - In this month's Shooting Sports USA, Barb Baird of Women's Outdoor News sits down with famed shooter Matt Emmons to find out what the professional rifle shooter, and Olympian, carries around with him to the range.

Emmons has competed on the U.S. National Team since 1997, medaling in three Olympic games: Gold in 2004 in Men’s 50m Rie Prone (center); Silver in 2008 in Men’s 50m Rie Prone; and Bronze in 2012 in Men’s 50m 3X40. Although born and raised in New Jersey, he traveled west for a bachelor's degree in Accounting from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and an MBA from the University of Colorado. He now lives with his wife, Katy, and two children in in Plzen, Czech Republic. Katy is a three-time Olympian rifle shooter from the Czech Republic.

Although his specialty is Men’s 3-Position rifle, Emmons’ World Championship and Olympic Gold are in Men’s 50m Prone. He shoots a Bleiker Challenger .22 rifle, with Eley Tenex ammo.

What's inside Matt Emmon's range bag ...

Why this rifle is still one of the most high prized American military rifles

World War II GI with an M1C Garand Rifle

Gun writer and historian Bruce Canfield delves into the World War II's prized M1C Garand Sniper Rifle ...

The M1C Garand Sniper Rifle
When the U.S. Army sought a sniping rifle based on the M1 Garand at the end of World War II, the M1C, with its offset scope, was delivered in small numbers. Never the best solution, the M1C performed adequately in post-war service and remains one of the most highly prized American military rifles.

At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, the U.S. Army did not have a standardized sniper rifle. Early in the war, the Army Ground Forces requested that a sniper version of the M1 Garand rifle equipped with a telescopic sight be developed. However, it was immediately apparent that the M1 rifle’s action would require an entirely different approach than most bolt-action sniper rifles—which mounted a telescope directly over the receiver. Since the M1 had to be loaded from the top, a telescope mounted in such a location would not be feasible. The U.S. Army Ordnance Dept. tested several possible solutions—including a prismatic telescope with the eyepiece centered over the M1’s rear sight but with the body of the scope offset to provide the necessary clearance for the action. While it and other M1 rifle-based sniper designs were evaluated, a slightly modified Remington Model 1903A3 bolt-action rifle was adopted in early 1943 as the “U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, M1903A4, Snipers” as more or less an interim measure. Sizeable numbers of ’03A4 sniper rifles were produced and widely issued during the war until a satisfactory Garand sniper rifle could be developed.

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Familiar faces fighting for fullbore rifle title as Championship rolls to an end

Taking aim at 800 yards for NRA's Fullbore Rifle Championship in Ohio

Port Clinton, Ohio - Today's schedule of fullbore for the NRA National Rifle Championships begins with little distractions. The weather is clear, the competitors are positive, and the scoring is stable. Though the winds are still in play, the relatively low temperatures along with sunny skies means adjustments necessary for a V are few.

A V? That's right. Because we're shooting fullbore rifle, that means we're firing on the 5 V target. In other words, competitors only earn 5 points for a bullseye. On the flip side it means that only lose 5 for a miss or crossfire. Not something you want to hang your hat on, but a positive nonetheless.

More on Day 6 at the NRA Fullbore Rifle Championships ...

Taking time off and concentrating on F-Class rifle shooting refocuses 4-time champ

2014 NRA Long Range Rifle Champ Michelle Gallagher takes aim at Camp Perry

Port Clinton, Ohio - You could say shooting is in her blood. Raised in a home where national titles were about as regular as Johnny Carson on late night, it was only a matter of time until Michelle Gallagher won a National NRA Rifle title of her own. Or, as is the case this year, a fourth National NRA Long Range Rifle Championship.

“I started shooting when I was about 7,” Gallagher explained. “Mom was taking me and Sherri (her sister) to the range ever since we were little kids. “

More on Michelle Gallagher's 4th NRA Long Range High Power Rifle title ...

Change in distance and targets leads to trouble for some at Rifle Championships

Nancy Tompkins firing on the line at Camp Perry during NRA Championships

Port Clinton, Ohio - The final championships held on the hallowed ranges of Camp Perry is reserved for Fullbore. Call it a modified version of our Palma Championships. Actually, to be accurate, Palma is a modified Fullbore Championship. Here are the basics.

Competitors fire the same rifles used in the Long Range High Power Rifle competitions. The primary differences are two; distance and target. At the NRA Fullbore Championships, competitors will fire from 300, 600, 800, 900, and 1,000 yards (internationally the 800 is usually replaced with 500). The targets, somewhat smaller, are of the ICFRA (International Confederation of Fullbore Rifle Associations) 5v variety.

More on scores at the NRA Fullbore Rifle Championships ...

Images from the 2014 NRA National Long Range High Power Rifle Championships

Spotter gauges the wind during NRA's Long Range High Power Rifle Championships at Camp Perry

Port Clinton, Ohio - It's never easy to stand behind the big gun. Wait for the wind, brace for the recoil, breath when the moment calls for it and fire. It's a religious experience for some.

This week at NRA's Long Range High Power Rifle Championships, competitors faced these conditions and more as the wind and sun and rain of Camp Perry taxed each and every shooter to the extent of their limits. A majority of those who arrived buckled under the pressure. Though a few, a select few, managed to rise the occasion.

More on the final shots at NRA's Long Range High Power Rifle Championships ...

New winners and old take to the stage for NRA titles

Team Remington Captain Ken Roxburgh with High Junior Waylon Burbach at the NRA Long Range Rifle Awards

Port Clinton, Ohio - A few hundred competitors, sponsors and NRA officials gathered at the Hough Theater last night for the 2014 NRA National Long Range High Power Rifle Championships. Some arrived to claim titles, others to congratulate their peers, it was a special night for all.

Led by Long Range Rifle Match Director Sherri Judd, the ceremony started 30 minutes behind the scheduled 8:00pm start time - another victim of yesterday's weather delay.

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